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the that the evidence we brought out in the environment of public works committee was new and hadn't been adequately considered. that was dr. o'connor's work showing the downstream harm from those near the mining of the tar sands and the testimony from a community organizer in texas about those who have health damage because of the refining of tar sands-type crude oil. and then those who are near the pepco, the waste product of it in detroit and chicago with really telling stories about children literally having to flee the baseball field to get away from the cloud of choking dust that was blown off the dump. >> mm-hmm. dr. o'connor, i keep hearing this, that the tar sands oil is far more toxic than anything else that the being refined anywhere in the world. is that correct, sir? >> absolutely. >> it is correct that there's nothing worse coming out of the ground on the face of the earth than this oil that's going to come out of the tar sands. >> all the information we have supports that. >> dr. o'connor, how toxic is it when it comes to imposing possible health risks on society? >> i guess from the
is an attempt to deal with this country's global foot print to create new strategic environment where the u.s. is supposedly more likely to be dealing in surgical operations and not heavy ground invasions. since the former vice president chose to compare food stamps and the defense budget, let's go ahead and take a look at what's actually happening on that front, too. the recently enacted farm bill cut the food stamp program by $8 billion which means about 850,000 households will lose $90 in monthly benefits. we've reported on that. this year, after 47 million people saw their food stamp benefits reduced because of budget cuts, that's the context, and yet everyone's talking about the military cuts because secretary hagel's proposed pentagon budget makes for an easy headline. like this. "pentagon plans to shrink army to pre world war ii level." okay. here's what some of those cuts actually look like. this is the context behind these headlines. on the left there, see the military's current level. in the middle, the proposed level. on the right, 1940 levels. here are total numbers. so while it
is saying in an environment where some of the folks are honest, they want to make up revenue, you have to find it. we are cutting defense spending. we were talking about infrastructure, potholes, state funding. >> you have to make sacrifices. >> in the previous segment. the people who are serious want to pick up the amendment. if there's any room to maneuver or wiggle, i don't think the way they've approached the tax code gives me a lot of real faith. capital gains is an important area. by the way, to abby's point, you want to know a big idea, hold up or down votes on the floor. the speaker can put each one of these out. what i think happens here is similar to what happens on immigration. there's some piecemeal conversations but you can't actually get a vote on what i think are the most important parts. the capital gains thing, i'll end here, it's a problem because today's wealthy americans make more money through stock dividends than were before in history. >> right. >> our tax code has not caught up with that. you were alluding to that. if we don't deal with that, and i think deal wi
in school is health practices, their diet, their sleeping and also the school environment that they're in so having a school environment based on caring and respect, one where discipline is equitable and fair and not suspended for things they shouldn't be and rigorous curriculum that's based on high expectations so that means having ap classes and honors classes and enrichment programs at the schools. all help black males to achieve in school. >> james, you contend that charity is not justice and that philanthropy is not policy. what do you mean? >> well, charity is not justice is my quote. i think the question is about scale. i don't disagree with either of our guests here. i think they're right in their assessment of it and starting the conversation but the question for me is about scale and while i appreciate and applaud all of the foundations at the table and the corporations that will come to the table, i think the federal government's got to be at the table to bring to scale the things that ivory's talking about. talking about nutrition in the public school system, if you want to talk
really comfortable in her environment. she seemed to have built a really strong relationship with the three other females in her pod. >> then just days later, travino and her lawyer reached a plea bargain which spared her the death penalty. she was sentenced to 18 years in the arizona state prison system. >>> coming up -- >> i stabbed him in his lungs and his kidneys. and he basically drowned in his own blood. >> in prison for manslaughter, one inmate's past can come back to haunt him. >> before i was an inmate, you know, i was a correctional officer here at this facility. [ male announcer ] did you know that if you wear a partial, you're almost twice as likely to lose your supporting teeth? try poligrip for partials. poligrip helps minimize stress which may damage supporting teeth by stabilizing your partial. care for your partial. help protect your natural teeth. with non-insulin victoza. for a while, i took a pill to lower my blood sugar, but it didn't get me to my goal. so i asked my doctor about victoza. he said victoza works differently than pills, and comes in a pen. a
in the environment, who knows what the next eight months will bring. >> fair enough. candidate recruiting is everything. i remember various conversati s conversations. i know on one hand you've had people that you've had conversations with, that have said, you know what, talk to me in '16 when they think it will be more democrats, knowing democratic voters, hillary clinton at the top of the ticket, the shutdown, it got you a few candidates you didn't think you would get because of the environment change in that small period of time. but have you found that you still are struggling getting some people off the fence because they'd rather run in a presidential year? >> no, not at all. in fact, you went through the list. what unifies these top-tier candidates right now is the fact that they are problem solvers. you know, we didn't have to recruit many of them. they recruited themselves because they'd had it with the shutdowns, with republican recklessness and irresponsibility. they are problem solvers in battleground districts. this is our initial rollout. there will be more. we'll have a ve
protest on an environment in a generation. >> we have thousands of young people here in the streets of washington, marching to the white house, to risk arrest, to demand obama said no to keystone xl. >> the most important issue that we're facing and it's going to affect millions of people all over the world. >> this is a march to show that young people care, care about our future, we're willing to come together and act, and now he needs to act. we are here together to show forth and president obama needs to make a pipeline. >> we need to show obama a lot of people who got him elected, youth vote, student vote, want him to take a stronger stance on climb and reject the pipe. >> we get arrested. first thing that this is not going to do anything. but as you go forth and you see people come to you and tell you you're a precedent you set, it has a huge impact. the most important thing pitting your body again the gears of the machine and say this madness must stop. >> what is profound about the sound bite we played the young lady said this is going to affect millions and millions of peopl
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this plan by hager does not accurately reflect the security environment. roy blunt, it has the potential to harm america's readiness. we're not likely to see the knock-down, drag-out fight. remember the sequester was supposed to be the stick that would force republicans and some democrats to negotiate a grand bargain. but as we saw, many republicans looked over the edge of the cliff and said, you know what, sequester not so bad. in fact, some conservatives support the sequester, for imposing cuts that congress wouldn't have had the stomach to put in place otherwise, and for republicans, some conservatives who are putting fiscal responsibility near the top of their priority list, this may be a question of picking your poison. now, according to south carolina governor nikki haley, president obama delivered that message pretty bluntly when he spoke to republican governors at the chamber of commerce -- she was at the chamber of commerce, but this is what he said, according to her, when they met at the white house. >> the tone completely changed when we started talking about the national guar
is he grew up in a more forgiving environment. and in hawaii, if you got in trouble, there weren't any real serious consequences, but on the streets of chicago, the consequences could be fatal. and he -- i was going to say, he feels this enormous responsibility to make sure that all of our children grow up and have the ability for that fair shot and opportunity to reach their dreams and so many children are being left behind right now. >> yeah, let's talk about it. he wants to bring a spotlight to this. >> yes, he does. >> how will this work? you talk about reaching out to corporations. what does that mean? explain the mechanics of the initiative. >> sure, let's go through that. already, we have ten foundations who are committed to putting up resources, in addition to the ones they've already put up, $150 million has already been spent, and they're prepared to invest an additional $200 million. and then we have a range of corporate leaders very engaged and interested in this issue. and what we'd like to do is let's look at the programs that work, like the "becoming a man" program in ch
these the environment you want, uaw certain slit people for you to -- are the people to choose. they can't help with the wages. you have got a facility that's the most advanced, environmentally sound facility in the world right here in chattanooga, tennessee. so, what's this about? it's about one thing. it's about money and it's about power. >> now, in the arena of public opinion, do you think most common sense folks would say, that's involvement? that's real involvement in an election? overall, corker flat-out lied about the united auto workers union. >> we support the works council notion that they are trying to implement. we just had concerns about the uaw. we know of their track record. we know what's happened in communities were they've been located. we know they have been a job-destroying entity through the years. >> no, no, no, no. corker is lying when he makes comments like that about the uaw. uaw has saved thousands of johns all over the country and they have the numbers to back it up. let me be clear, folks. corker's intimidation of plant workers was absolutely unprecedented. never in
to their moneys stashed in british banks, that would become a very different russian environment. now they're walking in the streets happy and screaming. you know, ukraine is russia, or crimea is russia. i would like to see russia completely closed. it is not the cold war, but if the borders are closed for other reasons, how popular will putin become with grandiose strategies. >> certainly once you start messing with people's money, they take it very personally. lawrence, a question i had about this is, you know, there are other actors on the world stage who are like in syria, like karzai, who's been particularly difficult. how does the way that president obama handles this situation impact, you know -- iran is another one. what are these world leaders looking for? >> well, i think all of these are interrelated. while we want to penalize putin for doing this, you need his help both in syria and eastern. without the russians putting the sanctions on iran, we would not be at the negotiating table. i think you have to keep these things in mind. your other guests would know this. the soviets c
connell and the staunch opposition to obamacare. >> you know what in a sane environment people do when they have problems with a good objective? they fix the problems. the other choice is to just pout if you're not -- if your pear is not in the white house and make as many problems as you can, stop anything good from happening and if you cane stop it at least bad mouth it. and then when life being what it is and all of us being imperfect as we are, when there's a problem, do everything you can to make sure the problem is never fixed. it may work and get people torn up and mad all the time. but it's a dumb way to run a country. >> so according to the latest poll in kentucky, it's still anybody's race with grimes leading mcconnell. mcconnell's unpopularity may be leading the polls. mitch mcconnell seems anything but worried about the former president campaigning in his home state. he was asked about it yesterday on capitol hill. >> welcome him back. the last time he ran in 1996 he eked out a narrow victory in kentucky while i beat the current gov any by 160,000 votes, 10 points. in 2008 both bill and hilla
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is that i grew up in an environment that was a little more forgiving. >> that was the president today being quite frank and personal about his past. before nousing a new initiative that deems to help the would be barack obamas around the country. speaking to a pack room that included the parents of trayvon martin, al sharpton to bill o'reilly, he described his my brother's keeper initiative. he will be pushing associations to help young help of color overcome the profound effects of racism to meet their potential. he made his case in terms of how it would benefit not just the boys in question but the nation as a whole. >> the fact too many of them are falling by the wayside. dropping out. unemployed. involved in negative behavior, going to jail. cycles of homelessness breeds violence and mistrust. and our country is a little less than what we know it can be. so we need to change the statistics. not just for the sake -- and boys but for the sake of america's future. >> for most of his five plus years in office the president has strenuously and stood justly avoided framing any of his policies
to keep it that way. driven to preserve the environment, csx moves a ton of freight nearly 450 miles on one gallon of fuel. what a day. can't wait til tomorrow. >>> america's longest war may be coming to an end sooner than expected. the president ord ed the pentagon to draw up plans for a complete withdrawal from afghanistan by the end of the year. joining me now, jack jacobs. can i ask you this. is this posturing or does the u.s. really want to do this? >> i think we really want to do it but we shouldn't discount the fact that our politicians have a policy to think before they think, drawing lines in the sand we never tend to reinforce. so some of this is posturing but by the end of the day if we can't reach an arrangement with karzai, we're leaving. we are going to do that. we have areas surrounding afghanistan we can do some operations but i think the intention is to get out. >> a reporter wrote yesterday that u.s. officials told her that al qaeda is planning a comeback in afghanistan. some of that is politically motivated. how concerned are you that that is a reality. >> i think
to realize the enormity of their decision to get pregnant outside of a safe environment. >> this is not my idea of a day off. >> you've had a nice trip out. >> that's true, but scott was in a really bad mood and the school proved all of his fears correct. >> so it's hit scott badly. >> yeah, it has. now he's even more terrified because he's like, what if i am pregnant, you know. he's definitely going through it right now. i don't know how to really make it better for him either. >> although the school makes it clear that they don't discriminate, tom's not yet ready to accept this. >> i'm not going to let one person's opinion of me just ruin my family. >> it's nearly two weeks since scott's insemination and he's decided that today's the day to take a pregnancy test. >> chances are it's going to be negative and that doesn't mean that i'm not, you know. it just means i did it too early and i wasn't patient enough. >> why aren't you doing it with tom? >> because i want to surprise tom. last time when we took the test and it was positive, he was here, and so we like, you know, but i kind of wan
was saying, i want to be fair to the russian people consuming this in that controlled news environment, we're not saying that if you're buying the putin view of this, you know, that that's just -- you're just being dumb. i mean, there's a lot of ways in which he presents this that can sound reasonable if you hear nothing else. >> absolutely. and this has been one of the most amazing things of the putin project since he's come to power. he's created this kind of alternate reality. at first he did it domestically. when you're in russia, it's incredibly. the talk of democracy, the posters on the streets, the people out at also ryes, the lines at election booths. these are things that the kremlin orchestrates very, very carefully. this is the first time he's moved beyond his borders to do it there. so this is a very controlled campaign. it's a theatre. >> james welcome back to the show. thanks for joining us again. >>> coming up, vladimir putin's political machine. and later, breaking news from texas. wendy davis has become the first woman since anne richards to win a primary for governor of t
school wellness guidelines to help build healthier learning environments for our kids. and as part of this effort, we'll be eliminating advertisements for unhealthy food and beverages in our schools. because i think we can all agree that our classrooms should be healthy place where is kids are no, ma'am bombard eed for ads f junk food. our second announcement focuses on school breakfast. i cannot possibly overstate how important this is. right now millions of children in this country are showing up to school hungry every day. and that's why we're expanding our school breakfast program, ensuring that nearly 9 million kids in 2,000 schools start their day with a nutritious breakfast. >> joining me now, chef and owner of kraft restaurants. tom, we have come such a long way, when you consider what michelle obama has been campaigning for. >> pretty much dent kept at bay now for other children. the message is definitely getting across. the importance of school breakfast breakfasts, it really gets them learning. there was a study done recently that kids that get breakfast, not before the
environment with you. what have you told the court in this plea, this desperate plea, to keep your 6-year-old granddaughter? >> i've told them that he's a convicted felon, i've told them that he offered her to me for sale. during a phone conversation with him. he said when he was in tacoma holding facility, immigration holding facility prior to his deportation, he said that he would sign her over to me if i paid for immigration attorney to keep him here in the united states. i told the court that it was equivalent to human trafficking, and that with her emotional issues, that it was the wrong thing to do to send her, essentially, to another world that she doesn't know. >> what is your worst fear here? listen, we do know that people with felony convictions in many cases, obviously, are allowed to keep their children. a conviction does not mean that you are not going to be able to care for that child, particularly if it's not an offense against that child, but what is your worst fear as her grand mom knowing that in the end she could end up there with this man? >> if, you know, i believe ev
party in midterm election and the exception was the 2002 in the post-9/11 environment. the buck is going to stop with the incumbent party in power because america is not happy. i think quite likely the outcome the republicans keep the house and a possibility the republicans will pick up the senate even losing mitch mcconnell's seat. we have to be divided again until 2016. it is an opportunity for the republicans to put together a proactive message. i think it's a good time to be talking about our plans for the future in 2016. >> donny, you can look individually at the president and the way congress is viewed but take this all in tolg totta. 80% are angry or dissatisfied with the way things are going in washington. it's and old theme at this point. we see it in just about every poll. as robert said this is a pox on both houses. >> it's only three-point spread i think between the democrats and the republicans both on the negative side. statistically, not a big issue. i actually think that this is going to be a case of best human being wins a race. i think one could give an argument -- joe,
their overall political environment is favoring republicans. i think that has to do with the residue and hangover of all the health care controversies that battled the administration. we're still seeing some of the effects of that. the other thing in the republicans' favor is just the overall map when they're going to be in alaska, even in a state like north carolina, that ends up helping republicans, but is it the arizona that veto pointed out, even though it was vetoed, we've seen the republican party trip up on social issues, whether it was on that, whether it's on gay marriage, whether it's talking about contraception, and democrats want to be able to exploit that. i'm not sure that's necessarily going to be that silver bullet come 2014 in the mid terms, but that's what they want. >> let's talk about the senate here. we have a list of some of the republicans mentioned already. cory gardner, but bill cassidy, steve danes, tomorrow -- tom cotton. >> they have a lot of paths to pick up those senate seats, but those you just mentioned, in 2012, they didn't have a good track record. t
in an environment that was a little more forgiving. so when i made a mistake, the consequences were not as severe p. i had people who encouraged me, not just my mom and grandparents, but wonderful teachers and dmunt leaders. they pushed me to work hard, study hard, make the most of myself. if i didn't listen, they said it again. if i didn't listen, they said it a third time. they would give me second chances and third chances. they never gave up on me, so i didn't give up on myself. i told these young men my story then, and i repeat it now, because i firmly believe that every child deserves the same chances that i had. that's why we are here today. to do what we can in this year of action to give more young americans the support they need to make good choices. and to be resilient, and to overcome obstacles. and achieve their dreams. this is an issue of national important. it is as important as any issue that i work on. it's an issue that goes to the very heart of why i ran for president. because if america stands for anything, it stands for the idea of opportunity for everybody. the notion that no
myself in these young men. and the only difference is that i grew up in an environment that was a little bit more forgiving. so when i made a mistake the consequences were not as severe. >> joining us now is the host of "the reid report," my friend and colleague joy reid. "i got high." those words will be discussed a lot. we are 22 years after bill clinton said i did not inhale on the campaign trail. of course this isn't a discussion about drugs as it is so much a discussion about the president, his candor, his ownership of his own history, and fundamentally question of race and how the president is i think almost opening a new chapter, one that beegan with trayvon martin, a new chamter about his own cultural heritage and who he wants to be in his last three years of his presidency. what did you make of that? >> i don't think we've ever seen this much of the interior life of any president of the united states as we've seen with this president both because of the autobiography he wrote where he really dug into his own growing up, his own attitudes toward race, very candid about drug use,
was i could see myself in these young men. and the only difference is that i grew up in an environment that was a little bit more forgiving. so when i made a mistake, the consequences were not as severe. i had people who encourage me, not just my mom and grandparents, but wonderful teachers and community leaders. and they would push me to work hard and study hard and make the most of myself. and if i didn't listen, they said it again. and if i didn't listen, they said it a third time, and they would give me second chances and third chances. they never gave up on me. and so i didn't give up on myself. i told these young men my story then, and i repeat it now because i firmly believe that every child deserves the same chances that i have. this is an issue of national importance. it's as important as any issue that i work on. it's an issue that goes to the very heart of why i ran for president. because if america stands for anything, it stands for the idea of opportunity for everybody. the notion that no matter who you are or where you came from or the circumstances in which you are born,
environment. the only thing that's protecting him right now is this giant board of other -- with other names on the scandal sheet. so it's hard to spend enough time just on what a scandal samson is. >> and this is a question that's been raised in this whole process. when david wildstein's lawyer trying to get his bills paid. he also alluded to conflicts of interest between port authority commissioners. it's very unclear what he's saying but it seems he might be hinting at more about david samson. we've seen several conflicts come about david samson. a paz station in harrison. we' seen multiple examples. >> every breath samson takes at the port authority takes is a conflict of interest and christie knew that would be the case. he knew what his real job was. "up with steve kernacki." coming up, the republicans and ted cruz and the battle that never ends between them. and joy reid joins me to talk about the president's new initiative, my brother's keeper and the extraordinary comments the president made at the white house made today. and bill o'reilly will tell us why he doesn't want to be pres
environment people do when they have problems with a good objective, they fix the problems. in the end, that's really what alison is telling you, send me to washington, i'll do something that makes sense, and if there's a problem with it, i'll fix it. >> and today, in the latest sign the clinton machine is revving up, the most aggressive outside group supporting hillary clinton these days -- american bridge -- has released its first web ad defending her. the target? kentucky senator rand paul who's revived attacks on the clintons, in particular bill clinton, over the monica lewinsky affair. its message? paul is obsessed with the '90s. >> rand paul is out there, he's banging on the clintons every day. now, what's his strategy? >> well, i'm not certain he has a strategy. >> there's a lot of things going on right now that we need to be concerned about other than what happened 15 years ago. >> the record is what will be judged upon. >> it's not a long-term winning strategy for republicans. let's all go back and dance the macarena and talk about 1998. ♪ >> by the way, given that paul has called
with a bully in russia that more than willing to bully its way to decree alt the kind of government environment andal lie it wants in the ukraine, no matter what the ukrainian people want. we do need to be strong. i also think we need to make sure the ukrainians don't take any unnecessary pro tvocative acts. i would fully expect lavrov to be saying what he is, whether in fact they do that or whether they have a very different understanding of what their rights are in crimea where they have the large base, may be a very different story. >> congressman, do you anticipate that congress will approve more aid for ukraine? >> i think there would be strong bipartisan support for that. there are a lot of members on both sides of the aisle that realize, this is a critical battleground in the war of ideas and not only going to help determine what kind of future ukraine has, whether they can like their neighbor in poland, have a prosperous economy and open society or recede back to what russia is looking look, awe thor tear yan and we should do all we have but it will determine for those who live in russi
in an environment that was a little bit more forgiving. i firmly believe that he have child deserves the same chances that i had. because if america stands for anything, it stands for the idea of opportunity for everybody. the notion that no matter who you you are or where you came from or the circumstances into which you are born, if you work hard, if you take responsibility, then you can make it in this country. >> the approach to expand opportunity for all, not a right for a few. and as one white aide said, democrats have a different approach. we leave the economy grows best when it grows from the middle out. that's how the president wants his party to frame the midterm debate. we'll hear more on that when he addresses the dnc winter meeting. let's start the show with brian boiler. i want to go back to my brother's keeper, this interesting initiative the president is pushing. and i think back to 2008 when the president was introducing himself to the nation. for the most part, part of the bargain he was making with the nation was i'm not going to talk about race unless i have to and i'm cer
had this sort of disembodied environment where there was no real connection and people anecdotally were telling people, yeah, i was sitting on the brim for four hours, whatever. now you are hearing emergency phone calls that are directly related to the tie-up on the bridge and then you layer over top of that the political shenanigans of some really stupid people who decided to have fun and games at the expense of all those commuters and this thing takes on a whole different feel for people on the ground, which is why i think the poll numbers may shift a little bit more as these tapes get more airing and people hear that anguish and that anger on the bridge. that's gonna translate in poll numbers and that's something i know the christie people are going to be concerned about. >> you know, steve, the governor finally got a question or a couple of questions at the -- at his ask the governor forum earlier this week. and i want to play a little bit of sound from that because christie's tenacity has not abated at all. let's take a listen. >> i'm not gonna give into the hysteria of questi
that someone sees a gun on to how can we do this being least disruptive in a learning environment. and there's a lot of work to be done that lies ahead of us. >> there's one estimate that that work's going to cost over $2 million including retraining of police officers involved but now they're going to have to distinguish between good guns and bad guns on campus. where before all guns were bad on campus. greg, it seems to me that you might have some better educational purposes for that $2 million. >> well, yeah. and i think as a lot of letter writers have pointed out, i don't know nothing about guns, and i shouldn't have one. but with nine hours' training i too can become a hobbyist police officer and be authorized to bring a gun on campus and to use it according to my nine hours of training. i don't want vigilantes protecting me in my classroom. i think vigilante justice is best practiced at home. and i have nothing against it. just no, thanks, i don't need them to have guns if they're not trained officers of the law or have extensive experience. and people around them, professionals who wi
and hot environment. when people die outside, they can mummify or become skeletal quickly. >> this was lying in the desert for probably more than a year. maybe one to five years. >> our anthropologists can help with information that we can't get from an autopsy. >> like reading the bones, some people say. >> but all too often the bodies are not identified. >> what happens to remains when we finish our investigation is they're buried or cremated. >> and this is where they finally end up. in a dusty section of the county graveyard in a kind of giant filing cabinet. a monument to the ashes of the unknown and unclaimed. >> a moving story. our thanks to vocative for the work on it. that wraps things up for me. it's my favorite time of day, t "the reid report" with my favorite colleague, joy reid. stay tuned. she can print amazing things, right from her computer. [ whirring ] [ train whistle blows ] she makes trains that are friends with trees. ♪ my mom works at ge. ♪ [ ship horn blows ] no, no, no! stop! humans. one day we're coming up with the theory of relativity, the nex
schools get $2,000 a year more in funding than a regular public school. >> so it's a selected environment? >> absolutely. >> is mayor de blasio correct in doing what he's doing? >> he didn't shut any school. that is the irony. the bloomberg administration as it was leaving swiftly approved 49 applications for charters. he approved 39 out of 49. she got three new schools. three of her applications were denied. so she's saying that three of her schools were closed. they don't even exist. >> ruth, what did you take out of the conference down in texas? what is this movement going to do, and also what about -- that is kind of the belly of the beast down there when it comes to testing and forming the tests that our students will be taking. isn't it? >> it absolutely is. and you know as diane put it so he will lo eloquently, it's really the heart of the testing industrial complex. and i think what we see is a nationwide movement of public school activists, of teachers, of parents and students themselves who are saying there is something wrong when we have this dual system, when we have corporati
. are you arguing at this point when you look at the environment, technology, what we're up against, there isn't really a logical place for federalism here because of what you just mentioned? >> no, there's certainly a logical place and the states can easily go beyond what the federal government is requiring, and they are. you've had the northeastern states that entered into a compact on greenhouse gases and do some carbon trading, so there's a lot the states can and will do, but bottom line, these are issues that affect all americans, actually, they affect the world, and we need to be taking action on them. the world's not going to end tomorrow. nobody says that, but i think anyone who has been outside in the last year understands that things are changing. i mean, the world has changed since it was formed, but what we're putting into the atmosphere and the way we're changing land use is having an impact, making these things happen faster and be more severe, and we've got to slow them down to start to anticipate what we're going to have to deal with. >> and what do you say to republ
grew up in a more forgiving environment. in hawaii, if you got in trouble there weren't really any serious consequences, but on the streets of chicago, those consequences could be fatal. b.a.m. standing for becoming a man. it's an initiative you have all spoken about. walk us through this. >> this is about the president's opportunity agenda, making sure that everybody has an opportunity to succeed, and making sure we tap into the potential of every young man in america. there are too many people who have remarkable potential. i believe that everybody is gifted and talented. it's incumbent on us to draw out those gifts and talents. all too frequently zip code or other circumstances in life undermines your able to tap your full potential. that's what this is about, making sure we invest in young men of color, understanding that it starts with early childhood, making sure that we are looking at middle and high school, where we have bleak and brown kids disproportionately suspended, and making sure we have a pathway to the middle class and the work we do at the department of labor, mak
for the rest of this year. you know, i've worked in education, environment, science research, policy, and civil liberties, and, oh, voting procedures. a number of things over the, well, now nearly two decades. i'm in my 16th year, i guess. so i could point to a number of those things. but i do stand by that statement, that the congress is the greatest instrument. doesn't always work perfectly, there are days when it hardly works at all, but it is a great instrument for justice and human welfare. >> yeah, and i understand that you feel that way, and i think that probably comes from your pride of office and the hard work you do, but the composition congress has changed a lot, as we mentioned, "the times" and others focus on the fact when you depart, only one scientist will be left, there are a lot fewer veterans than there used to be, there's a lot more upper, upper incomes, anyone stationed in life and previous job or role or training isn't the only thing you can say about them. i do think it's fair to say that the institution has changed in the aggregate of who's in it, and i don't think it's a
, could do to the environment. the protesters say the risk of oil spills and the destruction of wildlife outweigh the potential benefits of creating a few hundred jobs. we'll have more coming up in a few minutes on something else that's tied to our addiction to oil, climate change. plus, some background on why we call it that, instead of global warming. stay with us for that. and don't forget to join the conversation with fellow reider fans on twitter, facebook, instagram and keep telling us what's important to you. no two people have the same financial goals. pnc investments works with you to understand yours and helps plan for your retirement. talk to a pnc investments financial advisor today. ♪ >>> yet another massive winter storm barrels across the country after dropping torrential rain in the west and slamming the midwest it dumped snow and ice on the east coast. thousands of flights are canceled and hundreds of thousands of school kids are getting yet another snow day! yay! and federal workers in washington are also getting a snow day. their fourth this winter. all of that causin
as seriously as i should have. i made excuses. the only difference is that i grew up in an environment that was a little bit more forgiving. i firmly believe that he have child deserves the same chances that i had. because if america stands for anything, it stands for the idea of opportunity for everybody. the notion that no mat
, and i -- i think it's impossible in this environment to get anything done comprehensively. comprehensive immigration reform. comprehensive tax reform. the reason we had comprehensive health care reform, in spite of what you think about it, is because you had one party controlling the house, the senate and the white house. and so to do things comprehensively, i think it's tough on either side to get something done. i think you have to, you know, get more -- you're going to have more three yard gains in an environment that we operate in washington. you're going to have more three yard gains, than you're going to have 30-yard gains. it's just the reality of the system. so there's much in the bill that i think you could point to that was positive. but there's obviously a lot of things that even republicans would have concern about. to say that we'll create $700 billion in new revenue, alex, that's an assumption over a ten-year period of time, assuming that chairman camp would be the chairman of ways and means over the next ten years. i would buy into that. but even with that, that probably p
his opposition to obamacare. >> you know what, in a sane environment do when they have problems with a good objective in they fix the problems. the other choice is to just pout if you're not in the white -- if your party is not in the white house, and make as many problems as you can, stop anything good from happening. and if you can't stop it, at least bad-mouth it, and then when life being what it is and all of us being imperfect as we are, when there's a problem, do everything you can to make sure the problem is never fixed. it may work in an election get people all torn up, everybody mad all the time. but it's a dumb way to run a country. >> let's bring in nbc news political reporter kasie hunt, who spent time in ken last week with all of the top candidates. she did a great piece for us, looking at the senate race. your take on the latest developments, including bill clinton being brought in. >> delivering a stem-winder, as usual. clinton was trying to, in that bite you just played, sort of lay out an argument that alison grimes could use as she tries to defend the policies
promise to keep it that way. driven to preserve the environment, csx moves a ton of freight nearly 450 miles on one gallon of fuel. what a day. can't wait til tomorrow. >>> hello, nerdland. prepare yourself for a moment of deja vu. or maybe i should say, deja vote. see what i did there? because i can't say it any better than melissa or joy reid already have, like, you know, last weekend. >> unfortunately, it also means we've had to dust off the tried and true graphic that regular viewers of mhp show will remember from the last election cycle, back in 2012. that's right, this week in voter suppression! and this week in voter suppression, the state of ohio is back at it again. >> now, you guys know i love joy. it is not a contest. but let me try. once again, today, we have an edition of "this week in voter suppression sclts "! and it's brought to you by the letters o-h-i-o. it was just over a week ago that ohio governor john kasich signed laws that cut six days off of early voting and absentee ballots were limited and john husted delivered another setback to voting rights with another cu
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